M1 The Crab Nebula processed by J K Lovelace
M1 mounted in a black wood frame on a white wall next to a white vase with purple wild flowers.
M1 mounted in a black wood frame on a white paneled wall.
  • Load image into Gallery viewer, M1 The Crab Nebula processed by J K Lovelace
  • Load image into Gallery viewer, M1 mounted in a black wood frame on a white wall next to a white vase with purple wild flowers.
  • Load image into Gallery viewer, M1 mounted in a black wood frame on a white paneled wall.

M1 - An Explosion in Space

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Description

 

"Sky-watchers on Earth witnessed and wrote about a bright “supernova” (literally meaning “new star”) in the year 1054. What they were really viewing was the birth of rapidly expanding clouds from an exploding star. By the year 2021, roughly one thousand years later, these clouds have covered a distance of nearly 10 light years, and they continue to expand at a rate of about 1000 kilometers per second. In 1840, after viewing this supernova remnant through a telescope and sketching it, astronomer William Parsons thought that it looked like a crab, and the name “Crab Nebula” caught on. If you can't see such a crab, you're not alone! With modern cameras we can collect so much more light and detail than that which could be previously captured with the eye and eyepiece combo, so to me (and probably to you) it looks more like, well, an explosion in space."

 

A metallic paper print of M1, the Crab Nebula. Photographed by J K Lovelace.

 

This is, of course, the first object penned in Charles Messier's famous list of Deep Sky Objects, the first list of its kind. This accomplishment was a complete accident, best described as Messier's Catalogue of "strange things that definitely are not comets, so just ignore them." In the mid and late 1700s Messier and all of Europe were thrilled by the fad of spotting comets. He created this list to warn others away from these fixed, faint, and fuzzy objects so no one would mistake them for anything really exciting...

 

Each print is Made-To-Order.

 

Photo courtesy of denamorado.

Materials

 

MOAB Slickrock Metallic Pearl 260 gsm paper, acid free. From the maker's website: “Slickrock Metallic Pearl 260 transforms an image into life like, almost 3D quality.”

Technical Info

 

Total Integration Time: 27.90 hours

  • Planewave Instruments CDK20 OTA on an L500 mount
  • FLI ML-16803 imaging camera
  • QHYCCD QHY5III 174 guiding camera
  • Pegasus Ultimate Power Box V2
  • Astrodon Monster MOAG
  • Astrodon 50mm square filters